Snake Removal and Rattlesnake Fence Updates

A quick Western Diamondback Rattlesnake relocation from this situation near Marana the other day. The snake was likely hibernating within or near the box, taking advantage of a little sun before its primary spring activities.


The first snake removal of 2024 for CJ! The homeowners were getting ready for bed when one went into the kitchen and heard a rattle. The front entry door was cracked open slightly due to the wind, and this small Western Diamondback Rattlesnake decided to pop in. CJ caught it with no issue and released it into a deep granite cave shaded by mesquite on a wash terrace.

This was in Ahwatukee earlier in the week.


This small Sonoran Gophersnake was called in as a rattlesnake stuck in the garage. After moving some things around, Marissa discovered it tucked into some plastic. Learning that gophersnakes are harmless and great pest control, the homeowner opted to have it released back to his property.


The number one negative comment left on our socials about our snake fencing: “there’s nothing there, they can get right in”. Thank you!

These make our day, proving the point of just how little rattlesnake prevention will visually impact the view. Just visible here in the sunlight, you can see the smooth steel mesh applied by Brent on a recent rattlesnake fence installation project.


This little Sonoran Gophersnake was called in as a rattlesnake, fleeing to hide in a rosemary right before Marissa arrived. She found the little one and was able to grab it right before it disappeared. They watched the sunset together in Ahwatukee before it was released to carefully selected habitat.


It’s a little early in the year for front door snakes, but this one was likely displaced by recent heavy rain. It was relocated to a carefully selected spot to dry off.


We’re nearing the end of ‘garage snake’ season. This was a repeat visit to this home for Marissa, but the first inside the garage. Its head was just poking out when she arrived, making for an easy capture and release.


This Western Diamondback Rattlesnake had been seen hanging around over the past few weeks. The last few sightings were getting closer to the building where people come and go, so it was time to be relocated to elsewhere within its homerange. Marissa gently captured and relocated it to a carefully selected location.


No rattlesnakes were found on a recent property inspection, but Marissa did find a couple of shed skins. One was from a harmless coachwhip, but the other was left by a Western Diamondback Rattlesnake. The property was informed on the situation and what can be done to reduce future encounters.

To schedule a property inspection, email inspection@rattlesnakesolutions.com


Some rodent activity was noted during a recent property inspection. A detailed report about various, similar activity and other situations that likely have contributed to recent rattlesnake sightings and possible remedies were delivered to the homeowner. This is part of a regularly-scheduled property inspection service, which has shown to greatly reduce snake activity over time at even the most snake-friendly locations.

To schedule a property inspection, email inspection@rattlesnakesolutions.com


It’s hard to see, but there’s a Western Diamondback Rattlesnake hiding out behind the trash bins at this Tucson home. It was a very short crawl from deep cover where it had likely spent the winter. Dave was called out to relocate it to a staging area adjacent to a suitable replacement hibernacula.


A homeowner in Tucson heard her three dogs “going crazy”. Fortunately, all of them had undergone rattlesnake aversion training, and had kept their distance despite the interest in the visiting rattlesnake. Dave was called out to relocate the snake to a better situation for all involved.


A Western Diamondback Rattlesnake hiding out in the provided shade of a covered patio near Tucson. It was relocated to a better situation within its estimated homerange.


Barely visible and installed by professionals – this backyard won’t have to worry about the rattlesnake encounters of previous summers.


Nikolaus was called out to capture this Western Diamondback Rattlesnake that looked to have been displaced by the heavy rain. This was in a Tucson neighborhood, with several flooded packrat nests nearby where it had likely been staying.


With warmer temperatures come the move by rattlesnakes to become largely nocturnal. Here’s a recent one from Tucson, hanging out on a back patio. It was relocated to a carefully selected situation within its estimated home range.


Rattlesnake fencing installed by licensed, insured professionals. Share this with someone you know who could use a break from worrying about rattlesnakes in their own backyard.


Dave visited a place near Marana that had a rattlesnake a few days before, but found another stuck in the plastic cover. Pool equipment areas are common spots for rattlesnakes to den up for the winter, and this little one almost didn’t get to see the springtime. With some patience, Dave got it free and found a nice packrat nest for it to rest and contemplate its recent decisions.


Bryce went out for a call in Stetson Valley for a small snake cruising around in the entry of a garage. He found a Desert Nightsnake, a small and harmless species common in semi-urbanized areas. He found a good spot for it to safely continue looking for geckos and whatnot.


Lizard rescue! During a recent Property Inspection, Dave found a pair of Western Banded Geckos unprepared for the mass of rain. He helped them to a nearby dry hiding spot to return when the floods receded.


A big male Western Diamondback Rattlesnake did not appreciate being captured and unimpressed with Dave moving him from a front patio vantage point. Regardless, he eventually ended up making due with deep cover beneath some cactus within its estimated home range. Sorry dude.


A healthy, small Western Diamondback Rattlesnake was found hiding out under some stuff on the back patio near Tucson. It was relocated to a safer spot.


A large Western Diamondback Rattlesnake found under some patio furniture in Phoenix. These kinds of chairs aren’t suitable for rattlesnakes to really live under long-term, but make a great “camping” spot for a day.


A Western Diamondback Rattlesnake found in a garage recently. There are a lot of encounters just outside garages this time of year, as snakes that had likely been hiding in them for awhile finally start to make movements out and away. This one was relocated to a carefully selected situation within its estimated home range.


Bucket snakes! Here is some diversity of the Western Diamondback Rattlesnake. This is, as you may have noticed, the most commonly encountered snake in the area.


An old gate with new tricks. Brent installed rattlesnake prevention materials to this wooden gate, and rattlesnakes aren’t going to be coming in this year.


Kyle coming in with the flawless dual gate rattlesnake prevention install the other day! It’s like it was always supposed to be there.

Snake Removals and Snake Fencing Project Updates

Justin found this young Sonoran Gophersnake at a home where it had wedged itself in poolside decorative rock. It had recently eaten, so extra care was given to gentle handling and a carefully selected release site.


A home in Marana has a rattlesnake den in the back, and Dave had visited three times to find and move them to a better situation. These situations can be complex, since relocating an animal still in the late stages of hibernation demand particular criteria for successful release.

A neighbor had called the fire department the day before, though without this careful selection of replacement hibernacula, a snake crawls right back from where it’s dumped alongside the roadway to its home.


A really nice looking Western Diamondback Rattlesnake! Jeff found this one under a lantana next to a rock pile, where it had likely spent the winter. It was relocated to a suitable new den site.


New home, ready for summer in Arizona without that whole rattlesnake thing getting in the way. HOA compliant and installed by our licensed, bonded, insured and experienced team.


This rattlesnake was hibernating in the garage.

When the homeowner backed her car out of the garage, she noticed a little rattlesnake was in there as well. The snake went to hide in some nearby stuff and that’s where Marissa found it when she arrived. Some gaps at the edges of the garage doors are how it had been coming and going.

Relocated to a carefully selected replacement den.

Snake Removal

This Western Diamondback Rattlesnake was hiding out in a poison trap made for rodents for a few days, and still there when Marissa went out to capture it. Thankfully, it had not eaten anything, and would not die as a result or poison predators in the area. The irony is not lost here of rodent control killing off the more effective, natural, and free rodent control.


A condo homeowner found a rattlesnake under the grill cover on their patio. The homeowner’s dog had a swollen face, likely due to a snake bite. The condo is located near South Mountain Preserve, and a dead mouse was found earlier. The homeowner took the dog to the vet and removed the snake. The incident happened in Ahwatukee.

Please note: we do not follow up on the condition of pets after bites, typically. It’s a sensitive situation and aside from offering information at request, we respect the privacy of the homeowner.


Well, this is a new one. We were called out for a snake making sounds behind a dryer in the home. When Marissa got there, she found a bird stuck in the vent! She took it outside, and it flew off.


Brent finished up this gate so that rattlesnakes can no longer enter. No gaps exist anywhere greater than 1/4″, and the function of the gate is not changed at all. Installed by licensed, bonded, insured rattlesnake prevention professionals.


A young Western Diamondback Rattlesnake hiding out in a warehouse was caught by Dave the other day. It had likely spent the winter inside, and was found in its early spring movements. Dave found a better winter spot for it.


Dave’s first call of the year that was something other than a Western Diamondback Rattlesnake – a young Sonoran Gophersnake had succeeded in getting a springtime meal. It was released into appropriate habitat within its estimated homerange.


A homeowner called our Tucson snake removal hotline (520-308-6211) but lost sight of the snake soon after. Thinking he’d have to search for it, Nikolaus went out to get started … but the snake made itself known right away. This Mojave Rattlesnake looks to have come from a nearby new development, and likely displaced. A much better situation was found for it.


Another backyard ready for summer with a professionally installed rattlesnake fence.


A rattlesnake had overwintered in a rodent / erosion hole under pavement in an industrial area, and was seen on the move nearby. Marissa was able to get there in time to capture it and help get it to a safer situation for all involved.


A gorgeous Mojave Rattlesnake was hanging out in the supplied snake housing at a construction site in Mesa. Thankfully a worker saw it before reaching in, and called us out to help. This snake, likely displaced by the blading of a large section of desert for development, was moved to native desert nearby.


A rattlesnake was found taking cover under a bush in the front yard after initially being spotted in the driveway. Marissa went to north Phoenix to relocate this one back to native habitat.


From the outside, you’d never know this gate has been modified to prevent rattlesnakes from getting into the yard. HOA compliant, licensed, bonded, insured, and all that good stuff.

Snake Removal Update for Nov 1 2022

Temperatures are dropping and the regular snake season is coming to a close. Typically, it wraps up, more or less, by the end of the first week of November. This year is looking typical, with a handful of snake removal calls still coming into our hotline and a number of reported sightings, but nowhere near the frequency as a month before.

Snake Removals in Arizona Updated August 8, 2022

The monsoon moisture is bringing a lot of rattlesnake activity to the homes of the valley. As always, we have been very busy – now with the addition of baby rattlesnakes!

24/7 Snake Removal & Prevention: 

Phoenix-metro: 480-237-9975

Tucson-metro: 520-308-6211

https://rattlesnakesolutions.com
Western Diamondback Rattlesnakes
See the rattlesnake?
Tiger Rattlesnake
Another Tiger Rattlesnake near Tucson
Rattlesnake hiding near garden
Rattlesnake removal
Rattlesnake hiding in the corner
Rattlesnake removed from rocks near Scottsdale
A closer look at that rattlesnake
See the rattlesnake hiding by the post?
Western Diamondback Rattlesnake near a front doorway
Rattlesnake hiding in the backyard
A young Arizona Black Rattlesnake from our Prescott hotline
Rattlesnake hiding in the shade near a home
Rattlesnake removal in Cave Creek Arizona
A baby rattlesnake, the first newborn of the year for us.
Speckled rattlesnake hiding between patio furniture
Western Diamondback Rattlesnake hiding in pool equipment
Rattlesnake found while watering the plants.
Gophersnake climbing citrus trees.
Rattlesnake hiding in the garage
Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake from Phoenix
Western Diamondback Rattlesnake from Scottsdale
Another Western Diamondback Rattlesnake
And another
Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake from Phoenix
This Western Diamondback Rattlesnake was found in the lantana
Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake from Phoenix
Rattlesnake removed from a Scottsdale patio

Snake Removal Updates April 2022

We’ve been busy, not surprisingly. Rattlesnakes are now moving freely out from their dens looking for food and mates as temperatures continue to rise. Throughout April, we an expect this snake activity to increase until temperatures stay in the triple digits for consecutive days. Then, they’ll start making progress towards summer aestivation sites, where they will remain at or near until the monsoon.

Right now peak rattlesnake activity is, as expected, between 2pm and 5pm each day.

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Snake Removals in the Phoenix and Tucson areas – catching up February 4, 2022

We were busy last year 🙂 Here’s a combination of the snakes we captured and relocated in late 2021 and the handful every week over the winter. Just a few more weeks and we’ll be back and busy!

Happy 2022! Snake Removals and Snake Fence Installs

We’re in the dead of winter and getting a bit of time off on the snake removal side, which gives a bit of time to catch up on some photos from the end of last year. When things get busy, it’s not possible or reasonable to post every snake we catch, so things get spaced out to make sure that we have time to eat and sleep in between social media postings, and so that you don’t get upset with 20+ photos every single day 🙂

Our first removal of the year, however, came in right on Jan 1! Marissa caught two adult Western Diamondback Rattlesnakes hanging out in a garage.

These are the last of our 2021 calls and a couple of our first of the new year. Come on, Spring!

Snake Removal Updates, Fall 2021

This will be a big one … as the season winds to a close, snakes are busy. Not only are they looking for a last meal or two and mating, they have to travel to the places they plan on spending the winter. These dens, in the low and warm desert, can be just about anywhere that a snake can escape freezing temperatures and preserve the moisture they’ve been able to get during the year.

Typically, we remain quite busy through October and into about the second week of November. After that, rattlesnake activity decreases dramatically.

When do snakes go to sleep for the winter in Arizona?

Typically, primary rattlesnake activity ends in mid-November in the Sonoran Desert, and a few weeks earlier in higher elevations.

Snake Removal and Snake Fence Updates, 10/20/21

As the season winds to a close, there is the expected flurry of activity right at dusk as snakes move towards winter dens.

This will continue throughout October, into mid-November, when snake activity will more or less stop entirely. Here’s an article detailing when snakes stop being active in the winter in Arizona.

Here are some of our recent relocations, with many more to post.

24 Hour Emergency Snake Removal

Serving all of Arizona, Snake Fence Installation

Snake Removal and Snake Fence Updates 10/05/21

Late September and early October are usually pretty busy for us. As the monsoon wanes, we see snakes of all kinds getting ready for cooler conditions. That means there’s a lot to do: eating, mating, and traveling to wherever it is they want to wait out the winter. That can often mean they end up in a backyard or garage, and we’re called out to help.

A spike in calls usually happens right after dark. This will likely continue throughout October, dropping off dramatically in the first week of November. Of course the weather and conditions will largely determine how long this lasts, but this is a trend we see every year and we have no reason to believe it will be any different now.

Snake Removal in Phoenix and Tucson areas

Phoenix and Tucson Snake Fence Installations

Likewise, October is a time that many homeowners realize that the fear of having a rattlesnake in the yard is something that can be stopped at any time. Things like making landscaping changes and having a snake fence installed can make a huge difference.